Tuesday, December 9, 2008

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Travel Tips with “Baby on Board” – Our Recipe for Success

Airport travel during the holidays can be a recipe for frustration that looks something like this:

  • 2 Over Tired and Frazzled Parents
  • 4 TSA Security Agents
  • 3 Overworked Flight Attendants
  • 2 Bags of Peanuts & Warm Cokes
  • 1 Lost Suitcase
  • Add-in in a new little baby
  • Sprinkle in ALL the supplies necessary to take care of that little baby
  • End Result: Wishing you never left home!

In summary - This experience can be much like trying to bake 4 dozen cookies in an Easy Bake Oven. (Let’s face it - it’s not happening with a 100 watt light bulb)

We understand how much work traveling with an infant is so we’ve put together our own little Recipe for Success when traveling with “Baby on Board”. Click on the link below and you can learn some of the tips and tricks we’ve learned over the years that’ll make your Travel come out “Just Right!” Oh yeah, If you’re not traveling by plane you might still find some sage advice for car travel that’ll make your holidays much Sweeter!

>> Planning a Flight with Your Baby

Monday, November 24, 2008

BREASTFEEDING CRITICAL FOR PRETERM INFANTS

Press Release from USBC
November 24, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Washington, DC--When a baby is born premature, helping the baby survive is usually the first priority for new parents. The benefits of breastfeeding, including protection from many diseases, are especially critical for premature infants. As the country recognizes Prematurity Awareness Month, many are aware that more than a half million babies--one in every eight--are born prematurely each year in the United States. There is virtually universal agreement among health care experts that breast milk is the ideal form of nutrition for all infants, including those who are born premature.

Research has shown that breastfeeding protects infants from illnesses such as ear infections, respiratory infections, and diarrhea, as well as chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and childhood leukemia. For preterm infants, studies have demonstrated that breast milk provides additional protection from life-threatening conditions that are more common in prematurity, including necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and pneumonia.

Given all of these benefits, the United States Breastfeeding Committee joins the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the DHHS Office on Women's Health in recommending that infants be exclusively breastfed for six months, and continue to breastfeed for the first year of life and as long afterwards as mutually desired by mother and infant. Although many premature infants cannot feed from the breast right away, mothers can express milk manually or with a breast pump so it can be fed to their babies through a tube, with a dropper, or from a bottle. By expressing milk regularly, a mother keeps up her milk supply until her baby is able to breastfeed directly. The early milk, or colostrum, provides a boost to the developing premature infant's immune system.

USBC Chair Joan Younger Meek, MD, MS, RD, FAAP, FABM, IBCLC, calls upon hospitals and physicians to recommend human milk for premature infants, either through direct breastfeeding or by using the mother's expressed milk. Dr. Meek says, "Breastfeeding education and support should be provided as early as possible to mothers of preterm infants, and mother-infant skin-to-skin contact and direct breastfeeding should be encouraged as early as feasible."

When mothers are unable or unwilling to provide their own milk, donor human milk is the ideal replacement. The use of donor human milk saves infant lives and positively impacts health outcomes of countless premature and sick infants through prevention of disease. Human milk banks in North America adhere to national guidelines for quality control of screening and testing of donors and pasteurize all milk before distribution. Fresh human milk from unscreened donors is not recommended because of the risk of transmission of infectious agents.

For more information about Prematurity Awareness Month, visit http://org2.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=iTkkQCDKaB4BbuSlZArecWgsZ5lrDFDc. For more information about the benefits of breastfeeding, visit The National Women's Health Information Center at http://org2.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=5jDQ3JJIguuaPcYi3ucVR2gsZ5lrDFDc. In addition, the USBC has published a paper, "Benefits of Breastfeeding," and a position statement on "Safe Use of Donor Human Milk." Both are available for download at http://www.usbreastfeeding.org/.

Physicians and other health care providers can offer assistance and answer questions about breastfeeding. Knowledgeable breastfeeding support personnel to assist with breastfeeding the premature infant or expressing milk can be located through the International Lactation Consultant Association (http://org2.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=OhWTCv4KuCX5zea%2FKZFG02gsZ5lrDFDc), the USDA Food and Nutrition Service Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program (http://org2.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=kYcZMewySsnYBQiwWuMszWgsZ5lrDFDc), and La Leche League International (http://org2.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=%2BM8MGmO4QwDi0AHHtzOGbZH8Hqw9LvPk). Parents and health care providers seeking donor human milk may contact the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (http://org2.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=KOzhYQCE4Xg52icy80Dzk2gsZ5lrDFDc) for further information.

--------
The USBC is an organization of organizations. Opinions expressed by the USBC are not necessarily the position of all member organizations and opinions expressed by USBC member organization representatives are not necessarily the position of the USBC.
United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC)The United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC) is an independent nonprofit coalition of 41 nationally influential professional, educational, and governmental organizations. Representing over half a million concerned professionals and the families they serve, the USBC and its member organizations share a common mission to improve the Nation's health by working collaboratively to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding. For more information on the USBC, visit http://www.usbreastfeeding.org/.

###
United States Breastfeeding Committee2025 M Street, NW, Suite 800Washington, DC 20036Phone: 202/367-1132Fax: 202/367-2132E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.orgWeb: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org/

November 24, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT
Megan Renner
301-807-4963 (cell)
mrenner@usbreastfeeding.org

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Welcome to our Quandary - REVISED

By Wendy Haldeman MN, RN, IBCLC, Co-Founder of The Pump Station & Nurtury™

We are delighted with the success of our first two sizzling hot topics held at the Aero Theater. The feedback for the attendees has been very positive and we feel confident that our speakers had much to share with the audience. Our third and final afternoon should also prove to be valuable to new parents; however, the topic may prove to be a bit controversial.

Those of you who attended Dr. Karp’s and Dr. Stamm’s talks may recall that Harvey said he was not really in favor of sleep training and Jill stated, “I would never Ferberize a child”. Several of you have approached me and asked if The Pump Station is not being hypocritical in presenting a session on helping a baby to learn positive sleep habits.

Corky and I have wrestled with the concept of sleep training for years. As breastfeeding advocates, we are very conflicted with the idea of total night weaning, particularly in a baby less than 6 months of age. Our general philosophy and experience is that exclusively breastfed babies will often need at least one middle of the night feeding, regardless of the age and weight of the baby. We have sometimes had to counsel mothers who night weaned their baby only to discover that their milk supply had been significantly reduced and the baby was no longer gaining the proper amount of weight. This is more common when the baby is under 6 months in age. Admittedly, we are aware that many babies are able to nurse enough during the waking hours to maintain proper weight gain. We have discussed these issues in depth with Sleepy Planet and they are always careful to encourage parents to discuss any potential night weaning with their lactation consultants and to avoid weaning too quickly if there are milk supply, weight gain or medical issues of any kind.

The other burning question addresses the “emotional safety” of learning how to sleep by “crying it out”. The professional opinions on this vary greatly. Corky and I are also confused and conflicted by the whole concept. We work daily with mothers who are in true crisis due to sleep deprivation. (Isn’t this a tried and true method of torture?) Exhausted parents are not effective parents and sometimes attachment can be compromised when parents are too tired to function. We have seen sleep training completely turn families around to the benefit of everyone. But, is it a responsible technique to practice on an infant, particularly one under the age of 6 months? Sleepy Planet is very careful to present a gentle perspective on crying and gears its program to keeping crying to a minimum. However, they are respectful and nonjudgmental in this arena and encourage parents to do what feels right to their hearts. Parents can still implement many of Sleepy Planet’s recommendations, even if they choose not to do any kind of formal sleep training (i.e. creating a good sleep environment, well timed sleep schedule for night and naps, excellent bedtime routines, incorporating transitional objects into sleep, etc.)

In order to gain a better perspective on this subject, I turned to the magnificent mothers in my Hollywood breastfeeding support group. These moms are currently raising infants of ages ranging from 4 to 9 months. Sleep and the lack there of, is the constant subject of every group meeting. The mothers reminded me that The Pump Station is about presenting choice. The consensus was to definitely go forward with our sleep program and the parents can then decide what is best for their own families.

So, to continue our path of excellence, we can’t think of two better, more qualified women to present sleep training than Jennifer Waldburger and Jill Spivack. They are the co-founders of Sleepy Planet and have helped hundreds of families to achieve peaceful, heavenly, sleep filled nights. Jennifer and Jill are kind, caring, nonjudgmental women who will share their techniques and speak about the new research in the area of sleep. They are respectful, first and foremost of what feels right for each individual family and they offer alternatives to their methods including co-sleeping options.

Please join us on November 22nd at 1 pm. The program generally lasts for 90 minutes. Tickets are $25.00 per seat and all the proceeds go to charity. You may purchase tickets ahead of time at The Pump Station (by phone) or simply show up at the Aero Theater on Montana Ave. in Santa Monica the day of the event. We hope to see you there and we would love for you to share your thoughts with us regarding sleep or any other topics you would like to hear discussed.

Jennifer Waldburger & Jill Spivack of “Sleep Easy Solutions”

“Sizzling” Hot Topics Parenting Lecture Series at the Aero Theatre

Sleep Easy Solutions
November 22nd- 1pm

  • Co-Founders of Sleepy Planet
  • Co-Authors of "The Sleep Easy Solution - The complete Guide to Getting Your Baby or Toddler to Sleep"
  • Licensed Clinical Social Workers
  • Sleep Consultants, Psychotherapists
  • Leaders of Mother-Infant-Toddler Groups for New Moms
  • Charity-Cure Autism Now

Jennifer Waldburger & Jill Spivack will provide valuable information from their book with tips and tricks for new parents. The Lecture will be followed by a Q&A and book signing!

All ticket proceeds go to Charity!
Click here for more information

Don’t Miss This Unique Event!
Visit http://www.pumpstation.com/ for more information.

Friday, October 31, 2008

Don’t miss Dr. Jill Stamm on November 1st in Santa Monica!


“Sizzling” Hot Topics Parenting Lecture Series at the Aero Theatre

Featured speakers will provide valuable information from their books with tips and tricks for new parents. Each Lecture will be followed by a Q&A and book signing!

On November 1 at 1p.m. --- Dr. Jill Stamm author of “Bright from the Start”

All ticket proceeds go to Charity!
Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation
Children’s Hospital – Los Angeles
New Directions Institute for Infant Brain Development
Cure Autism Now

Click here for more information

November 1st Dr. Jill Stamm will be speaking about her book “Bright from the Start – The Simple Science-Backed Way to Nurture Your Childs Developing Mind from Birth to Age 3”

November 22nd Authors Jennifer Waldburger & Jill Spivack will be speaking about their book “The Sleep Easy Solution – The Complete Guide to Getting your Baby or Toddler to Sleep”


Don’t Miss These Unique Events!

Visit http://www.pumpstation.com/ for more information.

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Parenting on the Same Page

By Wendy Haldeman MN, RN, IBCLC, Co-Founder of The Pump Station & Nurtury™

Dear Parents,

I facilitate mother support groups day in and day out. A common theme/complaint I hear repeatedly among new moms is their inability to convince dads that there is validity in many of the new concepts in parenting. The mothers appear to accept and embrace the new research yet have real difficulty in bringing their partners ‘on board”. The most common areas of contention appear to be, 1) if and when a parent can spoil a child, 2) will certain parenting choices create bad habits, and 3) is the TV really harmful to infants and toddlers?

Moms, I have a solution for you. Turn off the football game, unplug the computer, and drag your man down to Montana Avenue for an enlightening afternoon. Dads often will not listen to Moms, but for some reason, they will turn their attention to an expert. Dr. Jill Stamm is the women to fill the job. She brings a unique combination of extensive academic credentials with personal experience. Dr. Stamm earned a PhD in Learning and Instructional Technology and has a specialization in understanding how people learn. She is currently a clinical associate professor at Arizona State University. Perhaps more compelling, Jill raised two daughters, one who was born severely premature and has significant learning disabilities, along with a daughter who is a PhD candidate in neuroscience at UCLA.

Parents frequently express their desire to do their best for their children. They want to maximize effective parenting skills and express frustration and fatigue over the enormous amount of information and product that is shoved under their noses on a daily basis. Dr. Stamm is able to explain how a baby’s brain grows and she guides parents in effectively “wiring” their babies brains so that they can maximize their learning potential. In sharing her extensive knowledge and practical experience, Jill Stamm enables parents to make thoughtful choices and sift through the information and product overload.

If you are pregnant and/or have a child under the age of 3 years, please consider attending our Sizzling Hot Topics Parenting Lecture “Bright from the Start” presented by Dr. Jill Stamm - this Saturday (November 1st at 1pm) at the Aero Theater, 1328 Montana Ave. in Santa Monica.

In our 30 years of practice, Corky and I have been exposed to many practitioners, educators, therapists, and authors. Few have impressed and excited us as much as Dr. Jill Stamm. Her message is exciting and powerful. Spend an afternoon with us and learn how you can nurture your baby’s brain growth. I promise you will not be sorry.

BREASTFEEDING REDUCES RISK OF BREAST CANCER

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
by the USBC - Umited States Breastfeeding Committee

BREASTFEEDING REDUCES RISK OF BREAST CANCER

Washington, DC-As the country recognizes National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, one protective factor often goes unmentioned: the reduction in the risk of breast cancer shown in women who have breastfed their infants. Many Americans hear that breast cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed and second most deadly cancer among women. Similarly, when discussing breast self-exams with their patients, many physicians quote the statistic that one out of every eight women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. Yet many still do not realize that multiple studies have shown that breastfeeding reduces the risk of breast cancer, in addition to lifestyle changes such as exercising, eating a healthy diet, limiting alcohol intake, and avoiding smoking.

USBC Chair Joan Younger Meek, MD, MS, RD, FAAP, FABM, IBCLC, affirms that research has demonstrated that breastfeeding protects mothers from both breast and ovarian cancers, in addition to the more familiar benefits enjoyed by breastfed infants, including protection against illnesses such as ear infections, respiratory infections, and diarrhea, as well as protection against chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and childhood leukemia. Studies also have reported a decreased risk of breast cancer in women with a lifetime breastfeeding duration of more than 12 months.

"Breastfeeding promotion efforts often focus on the benefits to the infant," says Dr. Meek, "but breastfeeding also provides a host of benefits to mothers. Increased initiation and longer duration of breastfeeding is a major cost-effective primary health prevention strategy to decrease the number of women in the U.S. who will be affected by breast cancer."

Given all of these benefits, the United States Breastfeeding Committee joins the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the DHHS Office on Women's Health in recommending that infants be exclusively breastfed for six months, and continue to breastfeed for the first year of life and as long afterwards as mutually desired by mother and infant. The USBC also urges all women to practice the elements of good breast health, including:

  • Obtaining regular mammography screening starting at the age of 40

  • Obtaining annual clinical breast exams

  • Performing monthly breast self-exams

  • Obtaining a risk assessment from a physician

For more information about National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, visit www.nbcam.org. For more information about the benefits of breastfeeding, visit The National Women's Health Information Center at www.4woman.gov/Breastfeeding. In addition, the USBC has published a paper, "Benefits of Breastfeeding," available for download at www.usbreastfeeding.org. A comprehensive Evidence Report, "Breastfeeding and Maternal and Infant Health Outcomes in Developed Countries," published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is also available for download at: www.ahrq.gov/clinic/tp/brfouttp.htm.

Physicians from the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (www.bfmed.org) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (www.aap.org) can offer assistance and answer questions about breastfeeding. The International Lactation Consultant Association (www.ilca.org) and La Leche League International (www.llli.org) also provide knowledgeable support personnel.

The USBC is an organization of organizations. Opinions expressed by the USBC are not necessarily the position of all member organizations and opinions expressed by USBC member organization representatives are not necessarily the position of the USBC.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

United States Breastfeeding Committee
(USBC)The United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC) is an independent nonprofit coalition of 41 nationally influential professional, educational, and governmental organizations. Representing over half a million concerned professionals and the families they serve, the USBC and its member organizations share a common mission to improve the Nation's health by working collaboratively to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding. For more information on the USBC, visit www.usbreastfeeding.org.

###

United States Breastfeeding Committee
2025 M Street, NW, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202/367-1132
Fax: 202/367-2132
E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org
Web: www.usbreastfeeding.org

Friday, October 24, 2008

Dr. Susan Love on Good Morning America

Dr. Susan Love will be appearing on Good Morning America, October 27th to discuss the Army of Women and to launch the first Army of Women “Call to Action” study — The Sister Study.

The Love/Avon Army of Women offers a revolutionary new opportunity for YOU to partner with research scientists to move us beyond a cure.

Breast cancer has been around for decades, but it does not have to be our future. We can be the generation that eliminates breast cancer by identifying what causes this disease and stopping it before it starts. This is your chance to be part of the research that will end breast cancer. Sign up for your sister, mother, daughter, granddaughter, best friend, and the woman you met last week.

Help us eradicate breast cancer once and for all.

Join the Army of Women today!

Source: http://www.armyofwomen.org/

Tuesday, October 21, 2008

STOKKE® Demo Day!

Higher is Better!™

Santa Monica - Saturday Oct 25th 11-4pm

Hollywood - Sunday Oct 26th 12:30-4:30pm

Stop by the Pump Station and Nurtury™ to meet STOKKE® Experts and Learn More about the XPLORY® stroller, TRIPP TRAPP® highchair, SLEEPI™ Crib & CARE™ changing table

Enjoy Personal Service with:
Product Demos every Hour on the Hour, Product Q&A, STOKKE® special buy of the day

All attendees will receive a STOKKE® Gift Bag and they will be entered into a Raffle to Win Prizes!

The Pump Station Santa Monica
2415 Wilshire Blvd.
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310)998-1981


The Pump Station Hollywood
1248 Vine St.
Hollywood, CA 90038
(323) 469-5300

Friday, October 17, 2008

10% OFF all KidCo Childproofing


SALE
10% OFF all KidCo Childproofing
Safety Products


As your baby is becoming more mobile you need to start thinking of ways to keep him/her safe throughout your home. We’ve searched high and low to find a great product line that allows you to keep your baby safe & we’re thrilled to announce that we now have an extensive line of KidCo Safety Products!

Don’t Miss Dr. Harvey Karp on October 18th at the Aero Theatre!

“Sizzling” Hot Topics Parenting Lecture Series at the Aero Theatre

Featured speakers will provide valuable information from their books with tips and tricks for new parents. Each Lecture will be followed by a Q&A and book signing!

On October 18th Dr. Harvey Karp

  • 10 a.m. - The Happiest Baby on the Block
  • 2 p.m. - The Happiest Toddler on the Block
All ticket proceeds go to Charity!
Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation
Children’s Hospital – Los Angeles
New Directions Institute for Infant Brain Development
Cure Autism Now

Click here for more information

November 1st Dr. Jill Stamm will be speaking about her book “Bright from the Start – The Simple Science-Backed Way to Nurture Your Childs Developing Mind from Birth to Age 3”

November 22nd Authors Jennifer Waldburger & Jill Spivack will be speaking about their book “The Sleep Easy Solution – The Complete Guide to Getting your Baby or Toddler to Sleep”


Don’t Miss These Unique Events!

Visit http://www.pumpstation.com/ for more information.

New! Home Safety & Childproofing

Get everything you need to Childproof your home at The Pump Station & Nurtury™

As your baby is becoming more mobile you need to start thinking of ways to keep him/her safe throughout your home. We’ve searched high and low to find a great product line that allows you to keep your baby safe & we’re thrilled to announce that we now have an extensive line of KidCo Safety Products!

Did you know that there are no federal or industry minimum standards established for products such as locking devices, latches or similar items!

Well, we chose KidCo because they are a founding member of the Global Safety Cooperation (G.S.C**) – a voluntary collaboration between international child product manufacturers.

Check out our website to see what we carry or stop by one of our stores!
http://www.pumpstation.com/

**GSC membership requires manufacturers to comply with all relevant standards and demands of national authorities. With combined decades of experience, the G.S.C. establishes additional and in most cases the only meaningful and measurable standards of performance for the products its members manufacture and market throughout the world. These standards include performance testing for push-pull exertion levels, material non-toxicity and durability, product functionality and ease of use, reliability and overall effectiveness. The G.S.C. is leading the way to making the future safer for children.

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Test Drive the STOKKE® XPLORY® Stroller!

Stop by to meet STOKKE® Experts and Learn More about the Xplory, Tripp Trapp, Sleepi & Care

Enjoy Personal Service with:
  • Product Demos every Hour on the Hour
  • Product Q&A
  • STOKKE® special buy of the day
All attendees will receive a STOKKE® Gift Bag and they will be entered into a Raffle to Win Prizes!


When:
Saturday Oct 25th - Santa Monica 11-4pm
Sunday Oct 26th - Hollywood 12:30-4:30pm

The Pump Station Santa Monica
2415 Wilshire Blvd.
Santa Monica, CA 90403
310(998-1981
The Pump Station Hollywood
1248 Vine St.
Hollywood, CA 90038
(323) 469-5300

www.PumpStation.com


Monday, October 13, 2008

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Presented by American Wellness & Imaging

American Wellness & Imaging is proud to present High Depth Resolution Breast MRI. Breast MRI can detect cancer in women at high risk. HD Resolution MRI images both breasts at one time vs. each breast individually, cutting down scanning time. Breast MRI is the most accurate form of testing for implant leakage.

During the month of October
American Wellness & Imaging is offering
Breast MRI’s for $750.00
(a $500.00 savings)

HOURS of OPERATION:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am- 7:30 pm Saturday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
LOCATION:
524 Colorado Ave, Santa Monica 90401
FREE ON-SITE PARKING
TELEPHONE:
310-260-2917

AWI also offers: MRI, CT Scans, Ultrasounds & Sleep Diagnostic Studies
We accommodate STAT patients

For questions or concerns, please contact the office and ask to speak with Tricia Najimian

A FAVOR TO ASK, it only takes a few seconds....

Please tell ten friends to tell ten today! The Breast Cancer site is having trouble getting enough people to click on their site daily to meet their quota of donating at least one free mammogram a day to an underprivileged woman.

It takes less than a minute to go to their site and click on 'donating a mammogram' for free (pink window in the middle). This doesn't cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate mammogram in exchange for advertising.

Here's the web site! Pass it along to people you know. http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

AGAIN , PLEASE TELL 10 FRIENDS TO TELL 10

Friday, October 3, 2008

We're looking for Part Time PR Moms!

Do you love The Pump Station & Nurtury™

Would you like to make some extra cash?

Are you looking to get out of the house for 4-12 hours a
week?

Learn more about this exciting opportunity!

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Help Find a Cure for Breast Cancer!

Hi everyone!

This past Spring we were informed of a wonderful organization called The Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation. In May we were a sponsor of the Palisades Love Walk which raised over $46,000 for Breast Cancer Research. This Fall they will be one of our primary benefactors when we sponsor our Sizzling Hot Topics Parenting Lecture Series at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica. (read more….) .


Here are many of the reasons we love this Foundation and encourage others to support them:

  • The foundation is dedicated to being in the forefront of breast cancer research, education and advocacy in order to eradicate breast cancer once and for all

  • They are different than other organizations because they realize that where cancer starts is in the milk ducts, and they are focusing all of their resources and research into having a better understanding of the breast through intraductal research

  • They are trying to identify the barriers to the research needed to end breast cancer, and creating new solutions that are fast, flexible and project based

  • They are committed to using their website to provide accurate and timely breast cancer and women’s health information
And most importantly, they have been instrumental in launching a new campaign to eradicate breast cancer once and for all! Tomorrow, October 1st on The Today Show, Dr. Susan Love will be announcing their partnership with Avon to launch The Love/Avon Army of Women – a revolutionary new opportunity for all women to partner with research scientists to move us beyond a cure!

Their message:
Breast cancer has been around for decades, but it does not have to be our future. We can be the generation that eliminates breast cancer by identifying what causes this disease and stopping it before it starts. This is your chance to be part of the research that will end breast cancer. Sign up for your sister, mother, daughter, granddaughter, best friend, and the woman you met last week.


Help us eradicate breast cancer once and for all.
Join the Army of Women today.


Sneak Preview: The Love/Avon Army of Women!

The Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation, in partnership with the Avon Foundation is incredibly proud to be kicking off this year' s Breast Cancer Awareness Month with the launch of a movement that will change the face of breast cancer research forever: The Love/Avon Army of Women!

Our goal is to recruit one million healthy women of all ages and ethnicities, including breast cancer survivors and women who are at high risk for developing breast cancer, to take part in the breast cancer research that will move us beyond a cure — and help us eradicate breast cancer once and for all.

The official Love/Avon Army of Women website is up at http://www.armyofwomen.org/ and in anticipation of our Oct 1 launch, we would love your help to test it and let us know what you think! Please visit the website, test it out and sign up to be part of the Army of Women. Send us your comments or any glitches you might encounter to webmaster@armyofwomen.org.

The official launch of the Love/Avon Army of Women will be on October 1, 2008, on The Today Show! If you live in New York, we need you to join us along with hundreds of other breast cancer “crusaders” on the plaza of the Today Show in midtown Manhattan. Dr. Susan Love will be a guest on the Today Show that morning, and we want to “pack the plaza” with supporters! You will receive a Love/Avon Army of Women t-shirt and pendant to wear, and a special section of the plaza will be set aside for our supporters. Read more...

Monday, September 29, 2008

MEDELA’S REVOLUTIONARY FREESTYLE® WINS JPMA INNOVATION AWARD

— 2-Phase Expression technology coupled with hands-free mobility allows active moms more freedom —

MCHENRY,Ill., September 12, 2008— Medela’s Freestyle®, the first rechargeable, hands-free, double-electric breastpump to give moms true pumping mobility, has won a coveted 2008 JPMA Innovation Award. Freestyle beat out more than 100 contenders for one of 10 spots awarded at the September ABC Expo in Las Vegas, Nev., last week. A panel of trade media and industry buyers judged the competing products.




“Since 1989, JPMA has spotted and saluted the best new products to hit the marketplace,” said Amy Chezem, communications director at JPMA. “We are pleased to honor Medela’s Freestyle breastpump this year for its technical innovation, marketability, trend-setting potential, appeal and usefulness.”



Freestyle was developed after five years of research as well as hundreds of hours spent talking to health professionals and observing more than 1,000 mom-testers. The result is a hands-free breastpump that is revolutionarily small, weighing less than a pound, but exceedingly powerful with Medela’s research-based 2-Phase Expression® technology that allows moms to get more milk in less time.



Freestyle really demonstrates Medela’s understanding of moms’ needs,” said Rachel Mennell, Medela’s director of marketing communications. “We are thrilled that JPMA recognized the innovation that was required to create a hands-free, lightweight, portable breastpump.”
Freestyle has a suggested retail price of $379.99 and is now available at specialty and mass retailers for purchase.



About Medela
Medela provides the most technologically advanced, superior-quality breastpumps and breastfeeding accessories to nursing mothers around the world. A longtime champion of breastfeeding, Medela is the only company to develop products based on research by the world’s leading lactation experts. As a result, Medela’s breastpumps are the number one choice of healthcare professionals and healthcare facilities worldwide, including 80 percent of U.S. hospitals.



Medela has developed an extensive line of products to meet the diverse needs of nursing mothers. These products include hospital-grade, double and single electric and manual breastpumps; breastfeeding accessories such as pump cleaning products, breast care products and specialty feeding devices; and maternity and nursing intimate apparel.



Founded in 1961 by Olle Larsson in Zug, Switzerland, Medela continues to grow under the ownership of the Larsson family. Medela serves customers through a worldwide network of distribution partners in more than 90 countries and its 13 subsidiaries in the United States, Switzerland, Canada, Germany, Sweden, France, Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg), Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, China and Spain. The company entered the United States more than 25 years ago; its U.S. headquarters are located in McHenry, Illinois.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

My Baby has Gas

In the twenty-five plus years that Corky and I have facilitated the mother support groups, we have noted that the number one concern among new mothers has never changed. If we have heard it once, we have heard it a “million” times, “My baby has so much gas”! There are a myriad of reasons for apparent gastric upset in the infant. The purpose of this blog is to discuss the possible association between cow’s milk protein and colic-like symptoms.

First, a distinction must be made between cow’s milk protein allergy and lactose intolerance. The latter is not an allergy; rather the body is intolerant to a carbohydrate, in this case the milk sugar known as lactose. Babies are rarely born with this condition. Humans may become lactose intolerant because they are genetically predisposed to lose the enzyme lactase which breaks down lactose. The reason why the infant may have problems with dairy is that the actual protein in cow’s milk differs from that in human milk. Depending upon which study one reads, the incidence of a true allergy to cow’s milk protein is somewhere between 15-20%. (This means that at least 80% of breastfeeding mothers can enjoy dairy products without causing their baby any problems).

A true dairy allergy can present itself in any of three ways, upper respiratory, through the skin (eczema), and/or gastric upset. Babies with true dairy allergy often appear to have frequent and extreme bouts of gas, large amounts of spit up after feeding, and some may pass blood into their diaper (see the blog “What’s That Doing in Your Diaper?) Another complaint from mothers is that their infant’s stools are particularly foul. Parents with concerns about possible dairy allergy need to first and foremost consult with their pediatrician.

So what about the baby who just seems to have “so much gas”? A certain amount of gas is totally normal for babies under 3 months of age. I never know how to define “too much”, other than to try and reassure new parents that babies normally and naturally grunt, groan and appear to have trouble passing gas and stool. Until the infant can use her abdominal muscles, relax the anal symphticter and the gut matures, gas is a big complaint. Don’t forget—babies aren’t socialized about the dos and don’ts of “gas-passing”.

Should a breastfeeding mother eliminate dairy from her diet? If your baby appears to have miserable gas attacks more than once a day, it might be worth a try. The general recommendation is to eliminate all milk, cheese, butter, yogurt and ice cream (yikes) from the diet. How long to do this is greatly disputed, but at least 96 hours seems to be the general consensus. Some anecdotal reports suggest up to 9 days. If the infant is not noticeably more comfortable, don’t torture yourself--have a bowl of ice cream! Interestingly, a number of our mothers have reported that they could have occasionally servings of cheese or yogurt, they just could not drink milk.

Mothers of babies with dairy intolerance can often return to cow’s milk protein after the baby is 6 months old. Some mothers can substitute soy for dairy; however some babies are both dairy and soy sensitive. Rice milk may be an option for the mom. Mothers on a dairy free diet should eat other calcium rich foods and may want to take a calcium supplement (consult with your obstetrician). Whatever the cause of your infant’s gas, just remember that parents can’t necessarily fix it. The favorite mantra of The Pump Station, “WITH TIME IT WILL GET BETTER!

Monday, August 25, 2008

Plugged Ducts

A plugged or clogged duct usually feels like a hard, tender swelling in the breast which often feels painful while breastfeeding. The skin over the affected area may be red and the area around the plug may feel full even after a feeding. Sometimes a small whitish-yellow milk plug can be seen at the opening of a duct on the nipple. Plugged ducts occur when milk flow is restricted, leading to poor drainage of the breast. Contributing factors may include:
  • Missed or irregular feedings and/or an unusually long interval between feedings.
  • Pressing the breast to provide nostril space for the baby.
  • Wearing a tight or poorly fitting bra that impedes milk flow.
  • Having an overabundant milk supply and insufficient breast drainage.
  • Practicing vigorous upper arm exercise.
  • Extreme exhaustion.
  • Rapid weaning.

An untreated plugged duct can quickly lead to a painful bacterial infection in the breast called "mastitis". The suggestions below will hopefully help you avoid this. If there is no change in your breast in two days or you begin to notice signs and symptoms of infection, notify your physician. Antibiotics may be indicated.


Treatment suggestions for a plugged duct:

  • Nurse more frequently than usual, every 2 to 3 hours.
  • Do not miss any feedings.
  • Start each nursing on the affected breast. If using only one breast at a feeding, nurse on the side with the plug at each nursing and pump the other breast as frequently as you would have nursed on it.
  • Apply moist heat to the breast for 15 to 20 minutes prior to feeds, or take a hot shower or bath. Heat helps fight infection and may help resolve the plug more quickly. Massage the breast while in the shower or between compresses, pressing with your thumb from behind the plug toward the nipple. A warm compress can be easily made by pouring water into a paper diaper and heating it in the microwave for a few seconds. Be careful not to overheat the compress as it could burn you.
  • Try gentle continuous hand pressure behind the plug while nursing.
  • Try a vibrating massager over the lump to help dislodge it.
  • Use a hospital grade pump to facilitate breast drainage if the baby doesn't nurse well or if you cannot tolerate feedings. You can also pump after feeds for 5 to 10 minutes while applying continuous pressure behind the plug.
  • If a plug appears at the nipple, soak the breast and gently rub the plug to remove the thin layer of skin covering it. Follow with gentle hand pressure behind the plug to force it out.
  • Vary nursing positions. Use gravity to help move the plug by nursing on all fours with the baby on pillows below you. Have the baby's nose or chin pointed toward the plug.
    Increase your fluid intake.
  • Increase your intake of Vitamin C rich foods and juices (citrus, cantaloupe, strawberries, dark greens).
  • Take Echinacea according to package directions to boost your immune system after checking with your doctor.
  • For repeated plugged ducts, some women find that lecithin is helpful in lessening the liability of a reoccurrence. Soy lecithin is a naturally occurring fatty acid. It is available in capsule or liquid form from health food stores and pharmacies. The dose is 1 tablespoon, 3 to 4 times/day; or 1 to 2 capsules (1,200 milligrams each), 3 to 4 times/day.
    Watch for signs of possible mastitis.

Click here for treatment suggestions for mastitis...

Friday, August 22, 2008

Taking Your Lumps Seriously…


By Jessica Sacher, RN, MN, IBCLC

Few things are more frightening to any woman than finding a lump in her breast. Finding a lump while breastfeeding in enough to create a state of panic. Most of us are aware of the American Cancer Society's advice to check our breasts and follow up with lumps or nodules in our breasts. Just because a woman is breastfeeding does not mean that she is "immune" to more ominous findings. The questions nags at us: Is it a plugged duct? Is it engorgement? Is it something else?

In the early days of breastfeeding, the breasts are undergoing many rapid changes. The milk comes in and we experience engorgement. Sometimes we can palpate the lumps and bumps in the breast in the immediate days following the birth. Normally these "lumps" become smaller and imperceptible as the baby nurses and removes the milk. In the next several days the breasts adjust to the demands of the baby and the lumps that were of concern no longer seem important. But what if you have a lump that does not get smaller after nursing or pumping?

The prudent course of action is to follow up with any lump that persists for more than 2 or 3 weeks. We at The Pump Station & Nurtury always recommend that a woman report this to her doctor and seek evaluation. A plugged duct should not last 2-3 weeks. A woman may experience lumps in different locations in her breasts that resolve with feeding or pumping, or a woman may be prone to repeated bouts of plugged ducts, but this is different than a lump that persists for 2 -3 weeks. The hallmark symptom of a plugged duct is tenderness or pain. It is often the precursor to mastitis (breast infection). An unresolved painless lump needs to be evaluated.

Perhaps it seems overly aggressive to suggest that a breastfeeding woman be evaluated after only a couple of weeks, but it is better to error on the side of caution. Several years ago, a mother with a one year old came to see me with a "plugged duct" that she’d had for several months. She had done all the right things: saw her primary doctor, her OB, and finally a surgeon. The problem was that not one of these health care providers had ever examined her breast. By the time I saw her, the "plug” occupied over half of her breast, and it wasn't a plugged duct. She had breast cancer, but because she was breastfeeding no one took her symptoms seriously. She went on to have treatment and did well, but if someone had just evaluated the lump she would have been diagnosed so much earlier. Finding breast cancer is the exception not the rule, but it has made us very cautious and proactive. If your doctor doesn't suggest an ultrasound, ask for one. If your doctor doesn't examine your breast, ask him/her to evaluate what you are feeling. Thankfully most breast lumps are benign and we can breathe a sigh of relief, but it is never wise to assume that something is nothing until proven otherwise.

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Fit Pregnancy – Medela Event – Win Prizes!

Hi everyone!

We've been very busy lately! As many of you know, we recently re-launched our website https://www@PumpStation.com. Our re-designed site is easier to navigate - allowing new parents to find what they need much faster. We've also got a fresh new look that mirrors the look of our remodeled stores. Come check it out and you can register to win some great prizes. Our vendors have supported our relaunch by donating over $2500 in great prizes. In addition to this, it's Breastfeeding Awareness month. So in celebration of this - at the end of the month we'll be holding 2 Sizzling Hot Topics . Peg Moline, Editor-in-Chief of Fit Pregnancy Magazine, will be lecturing on "Breastfeeding on the Go - Or, How to Breastfeed and Still Have a Life". After Peg speaks, we'll be hosting a "Milk'in Cookies Open House". Stop by and learn about Medela Products and get more tips on Breastfeeding from our Lactation Educator and Customer Service Reps. We'll be raffling off a Medela Free-Style Handsfree Pump to those who stop by. The day's events will be sponsored by Fit Pregnancy and Medela.
A few months ago we ran blog written by Wendy Haldeman, IBCLC and Co-Founder of the Pump Station and Nurtury tm, on "Breastfeeding on the Go". It got such a great response that we wanted to re-run it in support of our upcoming events. Enjoy the blog and have a great week!

Breastfeeding On The Go - Breastfeeding in Public

by Wendy Haldeman, MN, RN, IBCLC, Co-Founder of The Pump Station

A common concern among novice breastfeeding mothers is what to do when your nursing infant needs to be fed and you are away from the safety and comfort of your home, your favorite nursing chair and your breastfeeding pillow. The baby begins to whimper and show signs of hunger. Your palms grow sweaty. The baby starts to wail. Suddenly everyone is looking at you. What to do?

This is a dilemma faced by breastfeeding mothers every day. Sadly, some women decide not to breastfeed because they are so concerned about the possibility of exposing themselves in public. I can now laugh when I remember my first attempt at feeding my new baby. I parked my car in what I thought was a safe, quiet neighborhood, climbed into the back seat and "latched on". Just as I was feeling pretty darn good about my abilities, I was greeted with cat whistles, cheers and applause. I had chosen to park my car across the street from a high rise building under construction. Apparently, I was the entertainment for the morning coffee break. Oh well.

What expectant women need to know is that, unlike me, mothers are breastfeeding their babies in public frequently and the surrounding population are none the wiser. It does require some experience and knowledge before a mom can calmly and easily nurse her baby without anyone being aware that the baby is actually feeding.

Here are some simple tips to help you get started.


  1. To provide you with some sense of modesty, invest in a few articles of "nursing clothing". Our favorite is the Bebe au Lait Nursing Covers.

  2. Locate a breastfeeding mothers support group in your community. Many new mothers find great comfort in breastfeeding for the first time while among other nursing mothers and new babies in a closed room. Novice mothers can observe experienced mothers nursing without pillows in positions which allow for privacy and modesty.

  3. Once you network with other nursing mothers, you can arrange to go out for coffee with a group of experienced moms. Beginners find great comfort in being surrounded by women who breastfeed in any situation. Safety in numbers applies here. If the thought of all the other customers in Starbucks leaving in disgust worries you, stop! Think of yourself as a role model changing the culture for future mothers. And besides, you won't need to wait in line for your coffee.

  4. Next, park your car in an area where you feel safe. You are breastfeeding in public, but the car will provide a sense of privacy, unless of course you have chosen to park under a high rise building during construction.

  5. When ready, go to a park during a time when few people are around. This will enable you to feed in public, yet no one is really around to make you feel uncomfortable.

  6. Scout out department stores and restaurants that are baby friendly. These facilities will have family lounges, couches, etc. where you will be comfortable and undoubtedly encounter other nursing mothers. Nordstrom is a wonderful example of this.

  7. Find a restaurant where you can sit in the back, out of the way of most of the diners. A booth also gives a sense of privacy. Practice here.

The more you practice, the more comfortable you will become. Eventually the sweaty palms resolve and nursing your baby in any environment becomes second nature. If you would like in depth information regarding helpful tips, public breastfeeding and the law, pumping breastmilk at work and more see Our Breastfeeding Resources Page for videos and articles. Get access to thirty years of experience in guiding new mothers to breastfeed.

» See All Pump Station Classes
Locations in Santa Monica, Hollywood and Westlake Village, CA

» See Our Breastfeeding Resources Library

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month!

At the Pump Station & Nurtury ™ we work hard to promote Breastfeeding with all our New Moms. We encourage them to Nurse as it is a natural and ancient method for providing the best nutrients to your precious child. The World Health Organization, American Academy of Pediatrics and Surgeon General of the US recommend human milk as the natural food of choice for a human infant during their first year of life. With all that said, we see so many Moms every day and we do realize how difficult Breastfeeding can be for some of you.

It is important that we do our best to help make breastfeeding work for you and your baby. In order to help you Nurse successfully and comfortably, Corky & Wendy have put together a list of 10 items they believe every Mother should have.

Corky & Wendy's Top 10
  1. MotherLove Nipple Cream
  2. James McKenna’s book – Sleeping with your Baby
  3. Bosom Baby Nursing Pillow
  4. Bebe’ Au Lair Nursing Covers
  5. Bravado Body Silk Bra
  6. Pump In Style Advanced Backpack or Tote Bag
  7. Glamour Mom & Bravado Nursing Tanks
  8. Medela Nursing Stool
  9. Ameda Comfort Gels
  10. Hands Free Pumping Bra

"Elephant Rules"

by Bruce Tyson

While raising Juliana, my 23-year-old, our kitchen culture made up an important part of family life. Sure, all that good food didn╩╝t hurt, but the interactions of planning, cooking, and eating (or not eating, in some cases) made for lively conversation, too.

Lately, baby Isabella's nine-year-old sister Sophia has been wearing the sous-chef hat in my kitchen. Whether it’s the delicate task of stuffing goat cheese into squash blossoms, or the muscular work of squishing avocados for guacamole, she's game.

That's why – when making a caesar salad together – Sophia surprised me by her reaction to the idea of eating anchovies. She had been working on the olive-bread parmesan croutons while I made the dressing. Sophia watched as I opened a tin of anchovies and cut them into tiny pieces to mix with the lemon juice, garlic, and other ingredients.

"Dinggg!" The toaster-oven signaled the croutons were crisp enough for the first ritual of caesar salad: dipping the sharp, salty, crunchy croutons into the rich, tangy dressing – before everything gets diluted with lettuce.

Sophia, though, didn't want to dip. Why not? "I might get an anchovy on it."

And then, with complete obliviousness, I said, "But the flavors are all mixed together. You won't even be able to tell."

"Yes, I will."

"Just try dipping, and if a piece of anchovy gets on the crouton, your mom will eat it, and you can try again."

"Okay." Sophia dipped the crouton gingerly. "Mmmm," and she nodded her head. She was being polite.

With another feeble attempt at persuasion-through-pseudo-science, I explained the chemistry of caesar salad dressing, tossing in the concept of "anchovy-as-catalyst." I paused for a moment. "You haven't really learned about catalysts yet in 4th grade, have you, Sophia? No? I see."

Shortly afterward, as we all sat down for dinner, Sophia did more picking than eating her salad.

Driving to work the next morning, I replayed the prior evening's events. I recalled pulling the anchovies out of the tin and saying, “Sophia, see at all the little bones on the anchovy? It’s like little hairs on the fish.” And as I looked around the kitchen I finally saw the elephant that had been standing there the entire time. I got it at last: Anchovies are gross. Every kid knows that. But sometimes adults forget – or bury – what they knew as kids. And how could Sophia trust my instincts if I couldn't acknowledge the most obvious thing in the world, that anchovies – hairy and dripping with oil as they are pulled from their tin – are just plain disgusting.

When I saw her that evening, I shared my realization of the true nature of anchovies. She liked that and gave me a wide smile.

We haven’t yet tried the caesar salad again, but we have had another science conversation. The other night, we were all watching "Planet of the Apes", and one of the plot points is that the astronauts’ ship travels at near the speed of light, which causes the astronauts to age only a few years, while leaving Earth 2,000 years in the past. Sophia asked, "How does that happen?"

I went to the kitchen and pulled out my barbeque tongs to illustrate time dilation...

© 2008

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

WAITING

by Corky Harvey MS, RN, IBCLC, Co-Founder of The Pump Station

All three of my kids were born between 38 and 40 weeks gestation with only the influence of Mother Nature. I know that birth falls on a bell curve between 38 and 42 weeks with only 10% of babies born exactly on their due date. My daughter Colleen was one of that 10%, but now she awaits her own baby’s birth – she is 41 weeks today. I'm in Starnberg Germany (near Munich) waiting. I arrived at 38 5/7 weeks fearing I'd be too late, and wanting so much to be here to support her birth process, see my first grandbaby born, and mother Colleen during her early post partum days. After 25 plus years of helping countless women with birth and breastfeeding, how could I be anywhere else? But as the days tick by and my return date to the states is creeping closer, I'm getting panicky. The thought of leaving my girl here without my help is killing me. Now I know how all the Grandmas I've encountered through the years feel as they fly “back home.” I'm convinced this is not the intended way. Are we ever supposed to be so far from family? I'm trying to remain thankful for my many blessings but I’m truly torn apart by this…families belong together.

I'm not prejudiced, but I think Colleen is the cutest pregnant woman ever. Maybe it is because of all the walking she does here. She is fit, has only gained 21 lbs, has no complaints other than occasional heartburn and “keeps on trucking”. We've managed a little sightseeing between her now daily trips to the doctor or the Krankenhaus (hospital) where the baby’s heart rate is monitored and the amniotic fluid level checked. At the last Sonogram the baby had one finger up – yep, that finger. Maybe he/she is saying, “It's great in here-leave me be”. The doctor thought this view of the baby was so funny; he made a copy of the picture for his files. The Obstetric care in Germany is different from the states-it's free. Although monitoring for safety/health of infant and mother is done faithfully, the approach to birth is less invasive. “It will happen when it is supposed to.” However, yesterday Colleen was told by the hebamme (midwife) monitoring her at the Krankenhaus that she will be induced if she goes 12 days beyond her due date – not what she and her wonderful husband are hoping for. One day at a time has taken on new meaning for me.

I just got an email from my nephew with a recipe to induce labor. It seems there is a talk show host in Orlando that has come upon a food that he swears induces labor. He says it has worked for his wife twice... and there are several listeners who have called in over the years to say that, coincidence or not, his remedy worked like a charm. The recipe sounds weird, but not entirely unappetizing: Eat one box of Kraft Macaroni and Cheese with A-1 Steak sauce to taste (but don't skimp on the A-1). The expectant mother will go into labor within 24 hours. This only works on “past-due” situations and the woman must eat the entire box of mac and cheese (sans the box). Worth a try, but here's the big problem: No Kraft Macaroni or A-1 sauce in Deutschland. The midwives did suggest raspberry leaf tea, cervix softening suppositories and frequent squatting to get things rolling. But wait; there might be a more fun way to accomplish this: How about a big meal of delicious German Mac and Cheese, Kasespatzle, followed by a night of mad love making for the expectant parents. This ought to a get the ole' hormones flowing!

Aufweidersehen



Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Benefits of Babywearing

by Carla Shirer, MA – Pump Station Customer Service Representative

Throughout the ages, parents have worn their babies by adapting simple pieces of cloth, animal skins, woven baskets, and swaddle boards. Thirty years ago, Dr. William Sears coined the term “Attachment Parenting”, an intuitive style of baby care, that encourages wearing the baby. Today, families have rediscovered the sustaining secret of babywearing and its enormous benefits.

Fact: “...Babies do NOT lie quietly in their cribs. Babies must be picked up, calmed, played with, fed and put to sleep!...” Dr. William Sears
A helpless newborn requires constant close contact because he is unable to provide for himself. A baby worn in a sling or wrap, experiences a nurturing transition from the womb to the outside world. The parent can easily pat, stroke, caress, rock, and communicate love to the baby creating a stronger bond. This tactile (touching) experience gives the infant a head start by initiating changes in the brain, growth, production of disease fighting cells, physiological organization of the cardiorespiratory system and body control systems.

A baby that is worn three hours a day cries less and learns more. The baby is awake but contented and is able to learn from his surroundings in a calm, aware manner. This state is known as “QUIET ALERTNESS”. The baby experiences less stress, which decreases the production of cortisol (stress hormone). The baby sees what the parent sees, hears the parent's heartbeat, breathing, and voice. He feels the parent’s movements and quickly learns to recognize the difference between father and mother. There is a symbiotic experience as the mother becomes more confident and intuitively knows her baby's cues. As a parent responds to a baby’s needs, the baby learns trust, knowing that his needs will be met and his language understood. This results in a successful “Whole Parent-Child Communication Network.”

To a baby touch equals love. Touch is necessary for human development. Mild forms of sensory deprivation can come from the constant use of the car seat, bouncy chair, and stroller.
“...The easiest and quickest way to induce depression and alienation an infant or a child is not to touch it, hold it, or carry it on your body…” James W. Prescott, PhD
Korean infants spend more than 90 percent of their time being held. Anthropologist Meredith Smith, states in her book, Our Babies, Ourselves (Anchor Books, 1998), that American babies spend two-thirds of their time alone — in car seats (pearl), strollers, infant seats, cribs, playpens or swings.

Babywearing is such a simple solution to many problems that occur in an everyday routine.

Here is a list of benefits of babywearing:
  • Mother has hands free while offering security to the baby

  • Mother can breastfeed discreetly

  • Increases the production of prolactin, which increases milk supply

  • Reduces back pain that occurs carrying a car seat

  • Slings facilitate mother-baby eye contact

  • Mother becomes finely attuned to baby’s cues

  • A sling is a protective barrier from a stranger’s unwanted touch

  • Babywearing is fun

  • Father and baby have a stronger bond

  • Baby sleeps better

  • Baby cries less

  • Baby learns more

  • Baby is sick less

  • Reduces colic and reflux because of the upright position

  • Baby is less anxious

  • Baby thrives

  • Baby is happy, contented and well behaved

  • Babywearing decreases flat head syndrome

  • Baby wearing is an easy transition from the womb

  • Lowers risk of SIDS


The Pump Station and Nurtury™ offers a free sling clinic every week to teach new parents the art of babywearing. For more information, visit the following links:

Free Sling ClinicIn this hour-long clinic, we demonstrate a variety of slings and carriers including 'The Maya Wrap', 'The New Native', 'The Baby Pouch', ‘The Moby Wrap’, and the 'The Ergo Carrier'. Our experienced Sling Clinic instructors will work with you one-on-one to find the right position for you and your baby.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Will there be food on this flight?

Planning a flight with your baby
by Corky Harvey MS, RN, IBCLC, Co-Founder


Every week in our New Mother Support groups someone asks for tips on air travel with their breastfed baby. So here is a list of ideas that should make your trip easier. I hope this will also help my daughter Colleen when she travels home from Germany during the Christmas holidays with my soon-to-be-born grandbaby.

  • Make reservations early and book a window seat for yourself. It is easier to breastfeed when you can turn your back to the crowd and get the baby latched on, then sit back and relax.
  • If traveling with another person, request an aisle and window seat. If the flight is not full, you may get the whole row and if not, the person assigned the middle seat will happily take the aisle. You might try flying at lower volume times of the day/week. However, in the current travel climate there may be no such thing.
  • Take your Car Seat and your “Snap and Go” stroller right up to the plane and then gate check the stroller – it's waiting for you as you disembark. If there is an available seat you can take your car seat on the place with you. If not they will gate-check it too. If you don't have a gate-check bag, take large, heavy-duty bags and some masking tape. Covering the car seat and the stroller will protect them while in the cargo area.
  • Take your sling/baby carrier. This is great for walking through the airport, keeping your baby secure while flying, and calming a fussy baby on the plane – walking and bouncing. I just read the TSA website which states that babies need to be removed from carriers and strollers while going through the security checkpoint. www.tsa.gov/
  • A backpack diaper bag will keep your hands available for the baby.

  • In your carry-on pack an extra shirt for yourself and enough diapers/clothes for the baby to make it through a “blowout” or two. Be prepared for a delay or even and unexpected overnight stay.

  • Pack one diaper and several wipes in a Ziploc bag (do a bunch). When you need to change the baby just grab a baggy, make the change and use the Ziploc for the dirty diaper.
  • Buy disposable changing pads and throw them away after each use. This helps to protect the baby from the environment.

  • Check the TSA website and take a copy of the rules with you – you may need it at security. Currently you may take breastmilk through security (when traveling with or without the baby) in larger quantities than three ounces and in a separate bag from other gels and liquids. You must declare that you have the milk and are encouraged to carry on only what is needed until you reach your destination. Any other milk that you want to take, can be packed in large Ziplocs, surrounded by ice cubes or blue ice and placed in the bags you plan to check.
  • Take your Bebe au Lait. This terrific cover-up allows mom and baby to see each other and nurse discreetly. Also try a Nursing tank top and layers; the tank makes nursing so easy while keeping your midsection covered. The tank is beloved by most of our clients.
  • Planes are flying “germ bags” so take a few antibacterial wipes in a baggy and wipe down the arms of your seat and the tray table and don't forget your hand sanitizer – use it frequently.
  • Try to nurse your baby or offer a few sips of breast milk by bottle when you are taking off and landing. Getting the baby to swallow helps reduce pressure in the ears. If the baby is sleeping, don’t wake him.
  • Put drops of breast milk in eyes and nose repeatedly before and during the trip. This may help reduce the risk of the baby getting sick. It works like an antibiotic/antiviral –Good Stuff.

  • Ask for help: Getting your luggage through security, into the overheads, etc. can be a hassle. People feel good about themselves when they help others, so let 'um help.

ENJOY YOUR TRIP

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Corky & Wendy Recommend

Every day we have new Mom's and Dad's enter our shop asking us what they need before they bring Baby home from the hospital. They are inundated with literature and marketing materials but don't know how to sift through everything and make the right choices. Well, we decided to help simplify matters. As you know we carry an extensive assortment of baby care products, but we'll be the first to tell you that you don’t need to buy everything at once! So, we've come up with a list of Corky & Wendy's Top 10 recommended Baby Care Products. These are items we think every Mom & Dad should have. We hope this helps to make you feel more secure in your buying decisions as they pertain to your new Baby!

  1. Pump Station & Nurtury™ Soft Bottom Cloths
  2. Pump Station & Nurtury™ Burp Cloths
  3. Harvey Karp's “Happiest Baby on the Block”
  4. Thermal or Muslin Swaddle Blanket
  5. Baby Pouch Sling
  6. Any book by Dr. William Sears
  7. Exercise Ball
  8. Kissy Kissy Onesies & Convertible Gowns
  9. Baby Tracker
  10. Skip Hop Diaper Bag

We also highly encourage you to attend our Hot Topic Lecture Series. As a new parent, you need to become knowledgeable about everything from diaper rash & first aid to brain development and environmental pollution. Our Hot Topics Lecture Series can help you to learn what you need and still give you plenty of time to spend with your little one – we encourage you to bring them with you to class!

You might also want to check out our Baby Care Class at UCLA Santa Monica, It is offered once a month.

Classes fill fast so make sure you sign up early!