Tuesday, August 30, 2016


You shouldn't have to sacrifice comfort to nurse. 
Here are some tips and products Corky 
recommends for every mom's Nursing Nook. 
"I just worked with  a mom who at seven weeks post birth is still miserable nursing her little one-her back and neck are killing her (despite deep tissue massages) and her nipples are still a bit sore.

We worked a bit on deep latch and then


-I put her feet on the nursing stool
-changed to a more supportive nursing pillow 
-and gave her a back rest (our back pillow).  

She was thrilled and relaxed and bought all three items immediately. She also allowed me to take the pictures you see here. Nursing should be comfortable and relaxing!"
~Corky Harvey, MS, RN, IBCLC, Co-founder of The Pump Station & Nurtury®

Bosom Baby
Luna Lullaby
Bossom Baby
Nursing Pillow
Little Something Pillow
Luna Lullaby Lil
Something Pillow
Back Pillow
The Pump Station
Back Pillow
Nursing Stool
My Breast Friend
Adjustable
Nursing Stool
Lactation Support
Sometimes all we need is a little extra support. 
Intro to Breastfeeding


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Sometimes all we need is a little extra comfort.


You shouldn't have to sacrifice comfort to nurse. 
Here are some tips and products Corky 
recommends for every mom's Nursing Nook. 
"I just worked with  a mom who at seven weeks post birth is still miserable nursing her little one-her back and neck are killing her (despite deep tissue massages) and her nipples are still a bit sore.

We worked a bit on deep latch and then


-I put her feet on the nursing stool
-changed to a more supportive nursing pillow 
-and gave her a back rest (our back pillow).  

She was thrilled and relaxed and bought all three items immediately. She also allowed me to take the pictures you see here. Nursing should be comfortable and relaxing!"
~Corky Harvey, MS, RN, IBCLC, Co-founder of The Pump Station & Nurtury®

Bosom Baby
Luna Lullaby
Bossom Baby
Nursing Pillow
Little Something Pillow
Luna Lullaby Lil
Something Pillow
Back Pillow
The Pump Station
Back Pillow
Nursing Stool
My Breast Friend
Adjustable
Nursing Stool

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Some basics for all parents when thinking about Water Safety

Featuring: Coach Dave Kelsheimer –  Team USA Swim Coach Rio 2016, Head Coach Team Santa Monica Swim Club 
Cheryl’s #SupportLocal pick: Team Santa Monica Swim Club


nhlakes.org
I grew up with a pool, lived near the ocean, and later on my family moved onto a big lake in NH (yeah big for NH but not “Great Lakes” big). I could swim as long as I can remember – diving off the board at age 3. While the New Hampshire coast line is short – the waves can be big, the weather can be random and the undertow can be fierce. I remember a time when I was being pulled by the undertow, not sure of what was up or what was down-my dad grabbed me and pulled me up. He understood the variables and stayed close. Thanks Dad. While not a big deal to him, as it happened to him as a kid; it burned a memory into my mind. It was then that I learned to respect the water, the ocean, the lakes and pools. As a parent, an aunt, a friend - I have always put a tremendous value on children and adults learning to swim. 

My daughter Daniela just turned 9 in April, but at about the time she turned 2 I felt the urgency/need to have her learn to swim. I did some digging and found some programs around town (Santa Monica to Culver City) . She learned the basics and became water safe. I still sat poolside during all of these lessons watching her, feeling like my “2nd set of eyes” was critical to her being safe. 

Oddly, one day a friend asked me if I had heard about TSM (Team Santa Monica). I was unaware of TSM – asked more about it.  Apparently, right in my back yard (Lincoln Middle School) Santa Monica had a club swim program – Pre-Comp starting at about age 4 and Competition Level starting at 6+. I did a little research and set her up for an assessment of her swim skills. During her conveniently scheduled assessment - she was assigned to some team, named after some sort of aquatic character based on her level. It was all cute and made her feel like another character from “The Little Mermaid”- so all good.  Times for classes were accessible based on school schedules. Pricing was fair given the quality of the coaching - the quality of the coaching is amazing!

This is where I have to pause and praise what we have in our very own backyard. Team Santa Monica’s coaches are the absolute best, they care about the kids, they treat them with respect, and they teach them about commitment to excellence and each other. Whether you want your child to be water safe or become an Olympic Swimmer, I encourage you to check them out. 

I’m feeling especially proud of this team right now as they are sending off one of their swimmers, Jordan Wilimovsky, and their head, Coach Dave Kelsheimer, to the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio in just a few weeks. Yes, Team Santa Monica has an Olympic Swimmer and Coach! They understand the importance of this milestone accomplishment with the other kids and share with them that “this could be you”. It’s a powerful program which is why The Pump Station & Nurtury is proud to support this local business!

Like everything in the parenting world – every child and every parent is different – this may not be for you – but I encourage you to check them out.
Learn more about Team Santa Monica

By Cheryl Petran, CEO of The Pump Station & Nurtury®

Swim Safety - 5 Back Yard Water Safety Tips

Coach Dave Kelsheimer –  Team USA Swim Coach Rio 2016, 
Head Coach Team Santa Monica Swim Club 

#SupportLocal
Is there a local business you think is amazing and would like us to learn more about? Tell us all about it by emailing info@pumpstation.com and why you think it is great and we may just feature it in our upcoming class newsletters! 

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Thursday, May 12, 2016

Does Swaddling Raise the Risk of SIDS? Addressing the Recent Headlines

By now you’ve probably read the latest attention grabbing headlines “Does Swaddling Babies Raise the Risk of SIDS” or “Common Parenting Practice Tied to Higher SIDS.” Since this is a technique not only relevant to our moms, but also one we highly recommend as a way to soothe a fussy baby, we wanted to take a moment to address.

According to a study published May 9th in the online edition of the journal Pediatrics, infants swaddled during sleep have a greater risk of dying from SIDS, especially if they are placed on their stomachs. News outlets and Social Media have had a field day with headlines, however, CEO of The Pump Station & Nurtury® Cheryl Petran believes many of the posts going viral to be misleading: “They took this and twisted and rolled it up into a messy little ball.”

According to The Pump Station & Nurtury® Co-Founder, Corky Harvey MS, RN, IBCLC “Swaddling is the cornerstone of settling a fussy baby.  Learning how to swaddle so that babies are quiet helps with parent attunement with the child in learning how to handle and read them.”

Most of the articles go on to suggest that, according to the study, swaddling can be risky. However the actual conclusion of the study supports 2 widely held factors parents and pediatricians have already known for quite some time.

1.     Infants should avoid sleeping on their sides and stomachs to reduce the risk of dying from SIDS. Infants must be put to sleep on their backs.
2.     There is an age at which you should no longer swaddle.

Contrary to what some headlines suggest, the researchers identified a “small but significant risk” associated with infants swaddled and put to sleep on their backs. This finding actually keeps very much in line with the recommendation of pediatricians like The Pump Station & Nurtury® expert, Dr. Tanya Altmann, who states, “It’s perfectly fine to swaddle your baby and put them to sleep on their back in a safe sleeping environment.”


For more information on baby visit KidsInTheHouse.com

That being said, there was a small percentage of the infants who died of SIDS and who were swaddled and put to sleep on their backs that were found on their stomachs. This finding may have more to do with age and the fact that the baby is capable of rolling over.

So how long can you swaddle your baby for?

“Around four months of age a lot of babies will start breaking out of the swaddle. So, you may want to try swaddling them from the armpits down with their arms out and then taking away the swaddle when they become more mobile. A sleep sack is a great alternative. Your baby can still be warm and cozy, but their arms won’t be pinned down at their side. So follow your baby's lead if they enjoy being bundled up in a swaddle, then it’s perfectly safe and fine,” says Altmann

According to sleep specialist and Creator of The Happiest Baby on the Block, Dr. Harvey Karp“Swaddling is recommended until at least 4 months. Many babies are ready by that age, however, some benefit from an extra few months of swaddling. At 4 months, try to swaddle with one arm out (it’s important to keep the white noise playing all night). If your baby sleeps well with one arm out, you can stop the wrapping (but still continue the sound). However, if he does not sleep as well with one arm out, continue with the regular wrapping and sound and try the one arm wrapping again in another month.Stop altogether if baby is rolling to their stomach.

Corky Harvey believes, and Dr. Karp might also argue, that "Swaddling helps to prevent babies from rolling to their stomachs as soon, therefore lessening the risk of SIDS.  The small number of babies that died of SIDS while swaddled and on their backs may have died whether swaddled or not. There is no way to remove all risk." She goes on to ask "Was the baby a vulnerable baby (preemie or ill? was there a smoker in the house? Was the baby in a separate room? All experts—including McKenna and the AAP-- believe that babies need to be near the parent (arms reach) for the first 6 months of life.

"It should also be noted that SIDS rates have declined sharply in recent years. We have removed babies from stomach sleeping, and have put them on their backs. That proved to be, singularly, the most significant factor in reducing the instances of SIDS, according to anthropologist and author, Dr. James McKenna.


For more information on baby visit KidsInTheHouse.com

So perhaps instead of suggesting a perfectly safe, respected, and highly recommended technique for soothing your baby is the cause for SIDS, the viral headlines should be reading “If you’re going to soothe your baby via swaddling, be sure to do it properly!”

If you would like to read more info on this subject we suggest these two articles


You can also learn more about swaddling and other important information on how to help your little one to sleep, stop them from crying, give the first bath, and of course, how to Breastfeed & bottle feed in our BabyCare101 DVD or Digital Download


If you would like recommendations for sleeping sacks, we have several suggestions in our list of essential baby care items.

Monday, March 7, 2016

Time to "Spring Forward": Tips For Helping Your Baby With Daylight Savings

By Jill Campbell, Psy.D.

One question that often comes up in The Pump Station & Nurtury's Mommy & Me classes this time of year is, "How do I help my baby adjust to daylight savings?" Every year around this time we prepare to move our clocks forward one hour (Sunday, March 13, 2016). While adults can usually adjust to this time shift pretty quickly, babies and toddlers often find the change a bit more challenging. Here are a few different ways to help your baby transition to daylight savings time:


1. Don't Change A Thing:
If you are a parent that has been struggling with an "early riser," then by doing nothing, your baby or toddler will naturally be waking up an hour later! Simply move your clock ahead to the new time after your baby has gone to sleep on Saturday night. Your baby will wake up at their normal time Sunday morning, which will now be an hour later on the clock.  So if your baby was an early riser and consistently waking up at 5:30am, then your child will now wake up at 6:30am according to the new clock. Proceed with your normal daily routine according to the new clock. Meals and naptimes tend to go pretty smoothly with this method, but you may find that come nighttime, your baby or toddler isn't feeling so sleepy.  This is because if you are putting your child down at their "regular" bedtime (let's say 7:30pm), but 7:30pm tonight was 6:30pm just the night before. Therefore, you might need to be a little flexible with bedtime, maybe putting your child down somewhere in between the old clock and the new clock. Then for the next few nights, keep shifting bedtime up until you are at your child's regular bedtime according to the new clock.


2. Start to shift your baby's feeding and sleeping
schedule slowly ahead of time.
Starting six days before daylight savings, prepare ahead of time by moving feedings, naps and bedtime earlier by 10 minutes each day.  So if baby usually has her first feeding for the day at 7:30am, see if you can do that feeding at 7:20am.  If she refuses, don't force her, but you get the idea.  Just try to make the routine adjustments as the day goes on.  If her first nap of the day is typically at 9:30am, see if you can put her down closer to 9:20am.  These small time shifts should help your baby to go down a bit earlier at night without having a child that is just too awake for an earlier bedtime. If all goes well, then on Sunday morning after the time change, your baby will wake according to the new time.  So if baby typically woke up at 7am before the time change, she will now wake up at 7am according to the new clock.  Her feedings and sleep times should now be adjusted to the new time.  If you find it is still off a bit, (or if you did not start making these shifts so far in advance) just continue to shift in small time increments post time-change, until you are back on track.


3. Adjust the light:
Try to give your child at least a half an hour of natural sunlight first thing after waking up in the morning. This should help your child's internal clock adjust to the time change faster.  In addition, blackout shades can be very helpful if there is still sunlight coming into your child's bedroom at nighttime or before wake-up time in the morning.


4. Don't Panic:
Please remember that even if all this planning doesn't go quite according to schedule, simply by keeping to a steady daily routine, most children will naturally adjust to the time change within a week or so.
Jill's Favorite Products for Sleep
Daylight Savings Jill's Recommended Items
Daylight Savings Jill's Recommended Items
Daylight Savings Jill's Recommended Items
 
Daylight Savings Jill's Recommended Items
Daylight Savings Jill's Recommended Items
Daylight Savings Jill's Recommended Items
Sleep Classes & Services at The Pump Station & Nurtury®

Sleep: Getting Your Newborn Off to a Good Start
Ages: Newborn - 3 months with Jill Campbell, PsyD
March 21 at 2pm in Hollywood Enroll...
March 31st at 3pm in Santa Monica Enroll...

Sleep: Your Growing Baby
Ages: 4+ months with Jill Campbell, PsyD
March 14th at 2pm in Hollywood Enroll...
April 7th at 3pm in Santa Monica Enroll...
April 18th at 2pm in Hollywood Enroll...

Mommy & Me Groups - Topic discussed according to baby's stages. Sleep is a biggy!
Click here for more info... To enroll or inquire about available groups please email Dinora@PumpStation.com (Santa Monica Location) or Norma@PumpStation.com (Hollywood Location). Make sure to mention your baby's birth date so we can find the group that is right for you.

Sleep Consults available with Jill Campbell, PsyD.
To setup a consult please email Jill@PumpStation.com
Learn more... 

Friday, March 4, 2016

The Benefits of Baby Wearing


sling, consultant, lactation consultation, baby carrierBaby Wearing has been practiced for centuries all around the world; for many, it is and always has been an important part of life. Each culture developed a way for a mother to carry her baby while allowing her hands to be free to perform the necessary tasks of daily life. Today we have research to support that the traditional ways were likely the best ways.

Research shows that Baby Wearing may support the development of Happier, Healthier, Smarter, Safer Babies, and happier parents! Here are some reasons why....
  • The gentle movement and closeness to a parent reminds a baby of being in the womb.
  • The more babies are held, the less they cry. Crying raises the level of cortisol (a stress hormone) in the baby.
  • A fussy, tired baby can be easily put to sleep when placed in a sling and taken for a walk.
  • Babies who are worn may smile more and may have better social development with a better sense of self-esteem and independence.
  • Baby wearing may decrease the risk of flat head syndrome that can result from too much time spent lying in a stroller, car seat, or crib.
  • Baby wearing may lessen spitting up, colic, and reflux because of the upright position.
  • Baby wearing allows the baby to be an active participant in the movement of parents, thus promoting better neurological development.
  • Carried babies develop a strong and secure attachment to their moms and dads (grandparents and caregivers can also participate!).
Learning to wear your baby has a definite learning curve, so please don't give up. It does take practice.
Sling Clinics
Free Sling Clinics are offered in all locations once a week. In each
clinic our experienced instructors will demonstrate a variety of slings and
carriers such as:
Baby Carriers, Baby Wearing
So, leave your stroller and car-seat in the car and experience
the joys and benefits of wearing your baby!
Purchase a baby carrier online here...
or find a wider selection in-store.
Santa Monica
2415 Wilshire Blvd
Santa Monica, CA 90403
Sling Clinics held Thursdays at 1pm
No appointment necessary.
Hollywood
1248 Vine Street
Hollywood, CA 90038
Sling Clinics held Tuesdays at 3pm
No appointment necessary.